Heat-And-Eat Indian Food Makes Its Mark in U.S.

With hundreds of canned food options available in the market, Vijayi Gupta, now 78, found a big gap in the market.  “There was no Indian Food available as heat and eat package or as canned food.”

heat-and-eat indian food

Vijayi Gupta came to U.S. in the 1960s as a research engineer while Jyoti Gupta, his wife, and co-founder, came to U.S. as a food service director. Both met and married.

Soon, they started this new venture. What makes them different now?

The way they treat their employees, which are mainly immigrants, has always fetched respect for them. One of their employees is a victim of domestic abuse. These people gave her a chance to work, earn money for her kids and also fight her battle against domestic abuse.

Another employee of the Gupta’s couldn’t work because she had a physically challenged son at home who needed to be taken care of. Gupta’s arranged a special bus service to transfer the kid to every day to their office, got a special playing room made for him and allowed this needy woman to earn enough money.

Currently, they’re 40 employees who love their employers. Another unique point about this venture heat-and-eat Indian Food is the research.

Their business faced a major setback when they found it tough to separate stones from grains like kidney beans and black pulses. There was no machine available in the market that could do it. Vijayi Gupta, with his creative streak, made a machine by getting parts from home depot. This device now holds a patent and is being used by other companies as well.

Vijayi is now 78 years old and is as fit as new. He goes to the gym three times a week and plays tennis six hours a week.

Food Journal team is highly impressed by what Gupta’s have accomplished so far in the United States.

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